Testicular Cancer

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Testicular Cancer

Testicular cancer occurs in the testicles (testes), which are located inside the scrotum, a loose bag of skin underneath the penis. The testicles produce male sex hormones and sperm for reproduction.

Compared with other types of cancer, testicular cancer is rare. But testicular cancer is the most common cancer in American males between the ages of 15 and 35.

Testicular cancer is highly treatable, even when cancer has spread beyond the testicle. Depending on the type and stage of testicular cancer, you may receive one of several treatments, or a combination.

Testicular cancer care at Fairbanks Urology

Signs and symptoms of testicular cancer include:

Cancer usually affects only one testicle.

When to see a doctor

See your doctor if you detect any pain, swelling or lumps in your testicles or groin area, especially if these signs and symptoms last longer than two weeks. When you come in to your appointment at Fairbanks Urology, Dr. Nimeh will screen you for testicular cancer with a physical exam, and may also do a testicular ultrasound if necessary. 

Request an Appointment at Fairbanks Urology for Testicular Cancer Screening

Causes

It's not clear what causes testicular cancer in most cases.

Doctors know that testicular cancer occurs when healthy cells in a testicle become altered. Healthy cells grow and divide in an orderly way to keep your body functioning normally. But sometimes some cells develop abnormalities, causing this growth to get out of control — these cancer cells continue dividing even when new cells aren't needed. The accumulating cells form a mass in the testicle.

Nearly all testicular cancers begin in the germ cells — the cells in the testicles that produce immature sperm. What causes germ cells to become abnormal and develop into cancer isn't known.

Risk factors

Factors that may increase your risk of testicular cancer include:

  • An undescended testicle (cryptorchidism). 

  • Abnormal testicle development. Conditions that cause testicles to develop abnormally, such as Klinefelter syndrome, may increase your risk of testicular cancer.
  • Family history. If family members have had testicular cancer, you may have an increased risk.
  • Age. Testicular cancer affects teens and younger men, particularly those between ages 15 and 35. However, it can occur at any age.
  • Race. Testicular cancer is more common in white men than in black men.

Prevention

There's no way to prevent testicular cancer.

Some doctors recommend regular testicle self-examinations to identify testicular cancer at its earliest stage. But not all doctors agree. 


do you think it's cancer?

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